COP22 – Continued Progress Needs U.S. Business Leadership

victoriaAs world leaders gather in Marrakech for the 22nd annual Conference of the Parties (COP 22) it’s worth celebrating the remarkable progress made recently in the global fight against climate change, and the positive contribution of U.S. businesses in making it happen.

The Paris Agreement entered into force on November 4th, four years ahead of schedule. Its rapid ratification by over 100 countries representing more than half of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions demonstrates the commitment of participants to urgent action on climate change. Over 150 U.S. corporations publicly expressed support for the Paris agreement, representing more than $4.2 trillion in annual revenue and with a combined market capitalization of over $7 trillion.

Last month, the International Civil Aviation Organization agreed to cap greenhouse gas emissions from international flights at 2020 levels, using market-based mechanisms to offset climate pollution from this rapidly growing sector. U.S. airlines welcomed the agreement as an effective complement to their own efforts to cut emissions through improvements to equipment, fuels and infrastructure, and as a unified global approach to achieving carbon-neutral growth from 2020 on.

Also in October, negotiators from nearly 200 countries agreed to an amendment to the Montreal Protocol that will phase down hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), gases with 1,000 times the heat-trapping power of CO2. The agreement enjoyed the support of U.S. chemical companies that are developing environmentally preferable alternatives to HFCs, and is good news for companies everywhere that want to cut greenhouse gas emissions from their global supply chains.

Business support was instrumental in reaching all three agreements, and will be critical to implementing them successfully. The good news is that leading companies are already taking action to help the U.S. meet its climate goals. To build on this great momentum, more companies need to take the next step in corporate climate leadership. Here are three ways business can step up:

  1. Setting ambitious GHG reduction goals. PepsiCo recently announced a goal to reduce absolute GHG emissions at least 20% by 2025, joining Kellogg’s, General Mills and Walmart in setting big goals to cut climate pollution from their supply chains. Almost 200 companies have joined the Science-Based Targets initiative, committing to reduce their GHG emissions in line with climate science.
  2. Scaling up renewable energy. Over 80 companies, including Apple, General Motors and Unilever have now joined RE100, an initiative to by committing to use 100% renewable energy sources. And the Renewable Energy Buyers Alliance brings together three different initiatives working with break down barriers to large-scale renewable energy deployment. Together, these companies are leading the transition to a clean, low-carbon energy system.
  3. Shaping public policy. Leading businesses are looking beyond their fence lines and seeking to transform the systems in which they operate. By supporting climate and energy policies that impact entire sectors of the economy, they’re having the biggest impact of all. Earlier this year, eight companies including Apple, Google and Microsoft filed amicus briefs supporting the Clean Power Plan. And private fleet owners, engine manufacturers and technology providers joined together to advocate for the new Clean Truck standards announced in August by the U.S. EPA and DOT.

It will take the continued leadership of U.S. businesses to ensure that we stay on track to deliver on the promise of Paris, meeting our 2025 targets and bending the emissions curve even more steeply downward thereafter. Working together, businesses and policymakers can create a world in which a stable climate and thriving economy go hand in hand.


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