Collaborative Logistics: Shipping Together to Save Together

Collaborative logistics – where multiple companies cooperate to share freight capacity – holds the key to dramatic reductions in freight emissions and costs. Unfortunately, most consumer packaged goods (CPG) companies continue to manage discrete lines of supply to retail customers, passing up these opportunities.

  • Partially full trucks today run side-by-side on the highway, even though they are travelling to the exact same retail distribution center (DC), and freight could have been combined.
  • Outbound deliveries of full trailers ride alongside empty trailers returning home to the same destination after a delivery, even though the outbound shipper could have leveraged the opportunity presented by the empty trailer for an aggressive backhaul rate.
  • Heavy and light products cause trucks to weigh out before they’re full and cube out below the truck’s weight capacity has been reached, even when the solution could have been as simple as combining shipments of cotton balls and hammers traveling along the same route.

Examples of collaborative logistics at work

ocean spray More and more companies are recognizing the value of collaboration in meeting their sustainability goals. It turns out that when shippers climb out of their silos, good things happen. These are just a few examples of solutions being employed by companies:

  • Ocean Spray and Tropicana.  Tropicana shipped orange juice north from Florida in refrigerated box cars, which often travelled back empty to Florida.  Ocean Spray trucked its juice products from New Jersey to Florida along the same route. By shifting most of this TL volume to utilize Tropicana’s rail backhauls (CSX), Ocean Spray cut freight costs 40% for this lane and reduced greenhouse gas emissions 65%.
  • Whirlpool and Daltile. Both of these large manufacturers have factories in Monterrey, Mexico and ship product into the U.S. via rail. Daltile’s heavy ceramic tile reach a rail box car’s 200,000 pound weight limit with enough room for a 53-foot trailer. Meanwhile, Whirlpool’s appliances were cubing out box cars at just 35,000 pounds.  The solution?  Put four truckloads of tile in each box car (160,000) and fill the rest with refrigerators.  Each company now pays just 50% of the cost for the trip, but gets 80 percent of the maximum cube or weight capacity. Daltile’s complete freight collaboration program, generates $3 million in annual freight savings and reduces diesel fuel usage by more than 600,000 gallons per year.

Here are some tips to help your company get started on collaborative logistics:

  • Leverage your 3PLs. They service many companies and are in a good position to identify collaborative logistics opportunities and partners.
  • Look to competitors. Your freight is likely going to the same customers and DCs.
  • Share cost information. When lo-loading freight, mutual trust is critical to determining an equitable cost-sharing arrangement. Both companies must be transparent about what they are paying now.
  • Dedicated the required resources. The right collaborative logistics projects can have a huge payoff, but they require significant time and resources to pull off. Don’t underestimate the time required to make these inter-company projects work.

Find more tips on collaborative logistics and other green freight initiatives in EDF’s comprehensive Green Freight Handbook – a free guide to helping you achieve your sustainability goals.

GF-Handbook-CTA

Sustainability and Profitability Go Hand-in-Hand, Says Iowa Corn Farmer

Farming is a tough business.  With constantly changing crop prices, difficult to predict and increasingly extreme weather variations, and changing consumer demands, growers don’t have an easy time of it.

Like any business, profitability is the number one priority. And it should be – if you are not profitable, it’s very hard to stay in business.

All the growers I’ve worked with care deeply about their land. In a recent survey of a group of Midwestern farmers, “land stewardship” ranked as their top value.  And sustainability is in a farmers’ best interest since healthy lands plays a huge role in whether farms will be around – and productive – for the next generation. But making agriculture truly sustainable will require investment from farmers.

Here’s the good news: sustainability and profitability can go hand-in-hand. Efficiencies like fertilizer optimization can result in cost savings. And with those savings, growers can invest in new technologies and cover crops, which can help make farms more resilient and increase yields, generating long term economic gain.

tim-richter-saratoga-partnership

Tim Richter, owner of Saratoga Partnership

I asked Tim Richter, owner of a swine and corn farm operation spanning 9,000 acres in northern Iowa and Missouri, to tell me his profitability and sustainability story. Read more

Companies Hail Triple-Bottom-Line Benefits of Cleaner Trucks

Ben and Jerry’s became the latest corporate voice calling for strong fuel-efficiency and greenhouse gas standards for heavy trucks. In a Guardian op-ed, CEO Jostein Solheim made a compelling triple-bottom-line case for protective standards for new trucks.

holycowinc_2265_2844729Mr. Solheim noted that seventeen percent of the company’s carbon footprint is associated with transporting products. This includes bringing ingredients to manufacturing facilities (three percent) and moving the finished products to distribution centers (fourteen percent).

Like packaging, transportation and distribution is a consistent, significant carbon footprint component of every product: six percent of H&M clothes; twenty-five percent of the carbon budget from Mars; and thirty five percent of Philips operations, for example. And, trucks are the largest single component of distribution emissions, accounting for 57% of the collective impact. Therefore, it is in the interest of every product manufacturer and brand in the U.S. to see these trucks use less fuel.

Freight-share-GHGsThe single most impactful thing we can do today to reduce emissions from product distribution is to build more efficient trucks. We have the technical know-how to cost-effectively double the efficiency of freight trucks. We also know that having well-designed standards in place is a necessary step to bringing these solutions to market at scale. Read more

Improve Freight Capacity Utilization to Reduce Truck Emissions

Whether it’s a trailer, a container or a boxcar, better capacity utilization reduces the number of required freight runs and reduces truck emissions.

Despite the fact that most logistic professionals understand the value of building fuller truck-loads, recent research showed that 15–25 percent of U.S. trucks on the road are empty and, for non-empty miles, trailers are 36 percent underutilized.

Source: Homayoun Taherian, Cnergistics, LLC

Source: Homayoun Taherian, Cnergistics, LLC

Capturing just half of this under-utilized capacity would cut freight truck emissions by 100 million

tons per year – about 20 percent of all U.S. freight emissions – and reduce expenditures on diesel fuel by more than $30 billion a year (CELDi Physical Internet Project).

Nearly every company can improve trailer capacity utilization. Here are some real-life examples:

Kraft Foods: Because of the variety of products either cubing-out trailers (reaching the volume limit) or weighing-out trailers (reaching the truck weight limit), Kraft’s refrigerated outbound shipments were averaging only 82 percent of weight capacity. Kraft used specialized software to convert demand into optimized orders to maximize truck usage without damaging products. As a result, Kraft cut 6.2 million truck miles and reduced truck-load costs by 4 percent.

Trailer Orientation

Walmart: The world’s largest retailer was able to increase the number of pallets shipped in a truck from 26 to 30 simply by side loading pallets.

Stonyfield Farms: This dairy product manufacturer worked with its clients to help them decrease the use of dunnage (inexpensive or waste material used to protect cargo during transportation), allowing the company to maximize the available space per trailer.

What’s your load factor on outbound trailers?

To improve trailer capacity utilization as well as source other ideas to create a more sustainable freight operation, download EDF’s free Green Freight Handbook.

GF-Handbook-CTA

 

Accelerating the Shift to More Efficient Trucks

Freight transportation is the work horse of the global economy, ensuring that the products consumers want get on the shelves where and when they want them. With 70 percent of U.S. goods being moved by truck, freight is a key source of U.S. fuel consumption and corporate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Today, freight also offers companies a key opportunity to drive us toward a lower carbon future.

pepsico-logoIn a Wall Street Journal op-ed with EDF President Fred Krupp, Pepsico Chairman and CEO Indra Nooyi voiced the company’s strong support of the new fuel efficiency and GHG standards for medium and heavy duty trucks released June 19th by the U.S. Environment Protection Agency and Department of Transportation. Over the life of the program, these robust standards will cut fuel consumption in new trucks by 1.8 billion barrels of oil and reduce carbon emissions by one billion metric tons.

Leading companies like General Mills, Walmart and Anheuser-Busch have made reducing fuel use and emissions from freight a priority in setting their internal supply chain performance goals. But Pepsico’s willingness to step forward with this op-ed is a prime example of how companies can extend their leadership by aligning their public policy stances on with their sustainability goals – what EDF has been referring to as the business-policy nexus.

Freight affects all of us, but business is in the driver's seat

EDF - Building better trucksFreight transportation exists to serve companies that make or sell physical goods, from brands and manufacturers using trucks to bring in supplies and ship out final products, to technology companies needing trucks to deliver the hardware that powers their online services. While medium- and heavy-duty trucks only make up 7 percent of all vehicles on the road, they consume 25 percent of the fuel used by all U.S. vehicles.

Inefficient movement of goods wastes fuel, raises costs and increases environmental impacts. For firms like Pepsico, who maintain their own fleets, as well as those that contract out for freight moves, fuel is the single largest cost of owning and operating medium- and heavy-duty trucks. Truck fuel prices have increased 58 percent since 2009, a strong incentive for increasing the efficiency of trucks that move freight. Consumers are counting on businesses to solve this problem, as those costs are passed on to consumers. Through everyday purchases, the average U.S. household spends $1,100 a year to fuel big trucks. Strong standards can cut this expense by $150 on average a year by 2030. Read more

More Efficient Trucks Will Improve the Bottom Line

Here in the United States, the Environmental Protection Agency and the Department of Transportation will unveil new fuel efficiency and greenhouse gas standards for big trucks soon, according to the New York Times. At first glance, many companies might conclude that these new polices do not impact them. They’d be mistaken. In fact, they would be overlooking an enormous opportunity to cut costs while delivering real-world progress on sustainability.

Impact-of-fuel-efficiency-updated-5-15-low-rezThe fact is that nearly every company in the United States is reliant on heavy trucks, which move 70% of U.S. freight. Brands and manufacturers use trucks to bring in supplies and ship out final products. Retailers and grocers count on trucks to keep the shelves stocked. Technology companies need trucks to deliver the hardware that powers their online services. Even Major League Baseball has turned its dependence on trucking into a quasi-holiday.

More efficient trucks matter to all business because they will cut supply chain costs. Last year, American businesses spent $657 billion dollars on trucking services. A lot of that money went to pay for fuel – the top cost for trucking, accounting for nearly 40% of all costs. Read more

Campbell’s Soup Expands Fertilizer Optimization Programs

There’s a new reason to celebrate your favorite sugar cookie. The Campbell's Soup Company has committed to fertilizer optimization in its sourcing areas in Ohio and Nebraska – which provide wheat for Campbell’s subsidiary, Pepperidge Farm – and the company will enroll an additional 70,000 acres into its fertilizer optimization programs by 2020.

220px-Campbell_Soup_Company_logo.svg_Campbell's will work with EDF to create additional fertilizer optimization and soil conservation programs for farmers, and will deploy United Suppliers’ SUSTAIN platform in these sourcing areas to help ensure for farmers that changing their practices will not only reduce nitrogen runoff, but also protect yields and farm income.

With this announcement, the momentum for sustainable agriculture is higher than ever. Campbell’s is the latest company to participate in EDF’s Sustainable Sourcing Initiative, joining Walmart, Smithfield Foods, General Mills, and United Suppliers to make fertilizer efficiency and soil health the norm in U.S. grain production. Read more

The Who What Why and How of Safer Chemicals

This installment of our Pillars of Leadership series explores Supply Chain Transparency.

You can’t act on what you don’t know. And if you can’t take informed action, you can’t innovate in smart and sustainable ways. A key step toward achieving industry leadership on chemicals is to gain a full understanding of the chemical supply chain.

Pillars of Leadership for Safer Chemicals in the MarketplaceSupply Chain Transparency informs a company’s decisions to effectively mitigate risk of current or pending chemical regulations (see here) and to efficiently allocate resources towards product innovation (see here). It also improves the data-set for product life cycle assessments, thereby yielding more firm-specific results. Above all, Supply Chain Transparency helps a company define and understand its starting point and its goals.

What does Supply Chain Transparency mean explicitly? EDF defines true transparency leadership as knowing the What, How Much, Why, and Who of the chemicals in one’s products. Read more

Freight Sustainability Strategies: How to Get the Most From Every Truck Move

It’s no secret that better trailer utilization reduces the number of required freight runs. Fewer trucks on the road means lower freight costs and reduced greenhouse gas emissions – an excellent freight sustainability strategy.

Despite the obvious benefits, recent research from Cnergistics has determined that 15 to 25 percent of the trailers on U.S. roads are empty. For the non-empty miles, these trailers are 36 percent under-utilized. Capturing just half of this underutilized capacity would cut emissions from freight trucks by 100 million tons per year – about 20 percent of all U.S. freight emissions – and reduce expenditures on diesel fuel by more than $30 billion a year.

Source: Homayoun Taherian, Cnergistics, LLC

Source: Homayoun Taherian, Cnergistics, LLC

If you’re serious about pursuing freight sustainability strategies, load optimization is a good place to start.

Following are just a few examples of load optimization strategies in action. More can be found in EDF’s Green Freight Handbook – a practical guide for developing freight sustainability strategies for business. Read more

Behind the Label: How Business Sees Opportunity in Safer Chemistry

Behind the Label_FTens of thousands of chemicals are used to make the numerous products we use every day, yet regulatory oversight of the health and safety of these chemicals is severely lacking. Research has detected a number of these chemicals in our environment, homes, and bodies. At the same time, research has also linked a number of chemicals to disorders and disease such as asthma[1] and cancer[2]. Consumer concern is growing. With major retailers like Walmart, Target and CVS making public commitments to reduce the use of hazardous chemicals, chemical manufacturers and consumer product companies are hearing loud and clear the need for stronger policy solutions and market demand for safer chemical innovation.

EDF developed these case studies to highlight examples of innovative chemistries developed in response to demands for safer chemical ingredients in consumer products. The efforts of a leading brand and a chemical manufacturer – two ends of the consumer product value chain – are provided here.  We explore the motivation behind their product innovations and reformulations, what the innovations allowed the companies to achieve, and the impact of these innovations on their business and sector. These are not endorsements but rather an exploration of how companies are approaching safer chemistry innovation.

What We Discovered

A number of interesting results emerge from these case studies:

  1. Products designed to better protect human health can be economically successful.
  2. There is more than one way to resolve the same problem.
  3. Getting innovations to the market requires cooperation across the supply chain. Sometimes it requires external forces to set the right marketplace conditions.
  4. Reformulations can be cost-neutral despite changing suppliers and/or processing facilities.

A Snapshot of Each Case Study

 

akzonobel

AkzoNobel

In this case study we look at chemical manufacturer AkzoNobel’s work to create ingredients that have improved human health and environmental profiles. We learn how regulatory developments aided in the commercialization of AkzoNobel’s Dissolvine as a phosphate-free chelate in automatic dishwashing detergent. AkzoNobel collaborated with its customers and sought input from regulators to develop testing methods to examine Dissolvine’s biodegradability and human health profile. For the full case study, click here.

7th genSeventh Generation

In this case study, we learn about Seventh Generation’s work to replace a common surfactant used in cleaning products, Sodium Laurel Ether Sulfate (SLES). Production of SLES generates the contaminant 1,4 dioxane, a probable human carcinogen[3], that is then transferred to products. Seventh Generation succeeded in replacing SLES with the non-ethoxylated surfactant Sodium Laurel Sulfate (SLS), which is not accompanied by the 1,4 dioxane contaminant. Seventh Generation’s efforts resulted in a better-performing product and maintained sales. After launch and continued public concern about 1,4 dioxane, competitors of Seventh Generation announced  their own plans to reduce 1,4 dioxane in their products. For the full case study, click here.

We will be updating our Behind the Label series of blogs and case studies in the coming months and we invite you to join in the conversation.

 

[1]Bornehag CG et al. 2004. The association between asthma and allergic symptoms in children and phthalates in house dust: a nested case–control study. Environ Health Perspect 112:1393–1397.
[2]Huff J (2007). "Benzene-induced cancers: abridged history and occupational health impact". Int J Occup Environ Health 13 (2): 213–21.
[3] See National Toxicology Program, International Agency for Research on Cancer, and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency