Join Us Tomorrow for a Webinar on the Green Freight Journey

The Green Freight Journey is a five-step framework for freight optimization projects. Leading up to our January 14th webinar, EDF is taking a brief look at each step of the Journey.

We’ve all heard the saying, “Life’s a journey, not the destination.” Your Green Freight efforts are no exception.

The Green Freight Journey is about setting long-term goals and continuously learning.  Each time you reach a “destination,” remember to celebrate your success and share your learnings broadly within your organization and network.

Once you’ve acknowledged your success, challenge your department to take on new and more complex projects. As emissions from global goods movement continue to increase, the changes you make will make a difference and influence others to do the same.

To learn more about the Green Freight Journey, join us tomorrow, January 14th at 12pm ET for a webinar led by EDF expert, Jason Mathers. During the webinar, we will go into detail about the Green Freight Journey framework, review real-world case examples and highlight tools EDF is making available to help companies progress on their journey.

During the webinar, participants will:

  • Be introduced to the steps of a Green Freight Journey and receive tips for success on each;
  • Hear real-world examples of companies that have cut emissions and costs by optimizing freight moves;
  • Review existing tools, including a green freight benchmarking survey and the EDF Green Freight Handbook; and
  • Learn how an EDF Climate Corps fellow helped Ocean Spray Cranberries identify new green freight opportunities

Register now

Steps on the Green Freight Journey:

Be a Green Freight Superhero

Watch our EDF Supply Chain Heroes video to learn how logistics managers can channel their "superpowers" to drive their companies' sustainability efforts. The choices they make, such as moving cargo via rail or participating in a truckload consolidation network, have the power to slash costs and cut greenhouse gas emissions. Become a green freight superhero at your organization today!

The Green Freight Journey: Declare a Goal

The Green Freight Journey is a five-step framework for freight optimization projects. Leading up to our January 14th webinar, EDF is taking a brief look at each step of the Journey.

Green Freight Journey

These first three steps of the Green Freight Journey are fundamentally about getting “up to speed” on your journey. You start with your objective and metrics; launch a pilot or two; and then embrace the approach with wider adoption and a formal recognition. Now it’s time to invest in progress over the long term.

Companies set themselves up for longer-term success and spur innovation by declaring a goal, which is step 4 of the journey.

To do this, companies need to:

  • Assess long-term opportunities – More than just looking at what they can move forward on today, companies need to be thinking along the lines of what  they can build towards over the next 3-5 years.
  • Focus on continuous improvement – The metrics-driven approach we discuss throughout the Green Freight Journey will be key here. A long-term goal backed by objective metrics inoculates your effort from the threat of “big shiny object” projects – for example, that pet project of an executive that might be great for a press release, but won’t move the needle forward on the metrics.
  • Choose an actionable timeframe – The goal should be far enough on the horizon that you will be able to make some significant network changes over the time frame. It should be close enough, though, to be actionable.
  • Set specific targets – Your goal should be framed clearly so that all team members will understand when the project can be deemed a success.

Many companies are already setting goals for their freight operations; here are some examples to get you thinking:

Join me on January 14 at 12PM ET for a webinar that will introduce you to the full Green Freight Journey framework, review real-world case examples and highlight tools EDF is making available to help companies progress on their journey.

Register here today for this informative webinar.

Steps on the Green Freight Journey:

The Green Freight Journey: Accelerate Performance

The Green Freight Journey is a five-step framework for freight optimization projects. Leading up to our January 14th webinar, EDF is taking a brief look at each step of the Journey.

Once you have completed your green freight pilot project(s), it’s time to start applying your learnings at scale. Build off the success of your pilot—from one or two projects, can you now expand your program to five or ten? Below are some useful tips to help your company take the next step in the Green Freight Journey.

  • Formalize the team  It’s critical that your company’s Green Freight efforts are given a clear structure. Recognize team members for their sustainability efforts as part of the evaluation process. Put in place procedures for sharing results and bringing forward new ideas.
  • Scale successful pilots – Make sure you get the most return for your effort. Scope out opportunities where you can scale up your impact and look for additional lanes where you can deploy your learnings.
  • Identify new opportunities – Be on the lookout for new challenges to take on. Are there slightly higher-hanging fruit to reach for? What projects have a bit more complexity but could deliver significant return? For ideas, be sure to check out the Green Freight Handbook.

CycleThis is the stage where you really start to leverage the power of EDF’s Virtuous Cycle of Strategic Energy Management. It is a model of change we've discovered that applies to energy performance  including in freight applications – across even radically different organizations with five powerful, interdependent components.

  1. Executive Engagement
  2. Resource Investment
  3. People
  4. Identification, Implementation and Results Measurement and Verification (M&V)
  5. Stories and Sharing

The five components of this machine affect one another, for better or for worse. If the performance of one improves, it often improves the performance of all in a "virtuous cycle" of positive feedback. When all components function at full capacity, the cycle will run smoothly to improve energy performance, maximizing financial and environmental returns.

Join me on January 14 at 12PM ET for a webinar that will introduce you to the full Green Freight Journey framework, review real-world case examples and highlight tools EDF is making available to help companies progress on their journey.

Register here today for this informative webinar.

Steps on the Green Freight Journey:

The Green Freight Journey: Create Momentum

The Green Freight Journey is a five-step framework for freight optimization projects. Leading up to our January 14th webinar, EDF is taking a brief look at each step of the Journey.

Once you have established a Green Freight goal and defined metrics for tracking your progress, it’s time to start putting the wheels in motion. Below are some tips for taking the next step, creating momentum, in your Green Freight Journey:

  • Choose a pilot project – Select pilot projects that can be scaled up and replicated elsewhere in the organization, if successful. See our Green Freight case studies for examples of replicable pilot projects.
  • Focus on what you control – Choose a pilot project where you have direct control over the outcome. Examples here are increasing load factors or moving to intermodal from truckload. Projects that rely on the actions of suppliers, such as alternative fuel use by your contract carrier, are more difficult to execute.
  • Track results – Be sure to capture good data and use the metrics you created in step one. The data you produce will be a powerful tool in communicating the results of your pilot to employees, customers, and key stakeholders. The data will also help you identify new opportunities.

Below is an example from our Green Freight Handbook, which can help you determine which pilot project would be most impactful for your organization.

Green Freight Diagnostic

Join me on January 14 at 12PM ET for a webinar that will introduce you to the full Green Freight Journey framework, review real-world case examples and highlight tools EDF is making available to help companies progress on their journey.

Register here today for this informative webinar.

Steps on the Green Freight Journey:

The Green Freight Journey: Take Your First Step

The Green Freight Journey is a five-step framework for freight optimization projects. Leading up to our January 14th webinar, EDF is taking a brief look at each of the steps along the Journey.

The first step, Getting Started, is about deciding where you want to go. To do this, companies:

  • Gather internal stakeholders  such as supply chain or transportation executives, sustainability officers or EHS professionals, and an executive sponsor.
  • Define their green freight objective  such as reducing climate warming emissions or cutting fossil fuel consumption.
  • Determine key metrics – by reaching each agreement on how to objectively measure progress. A metrics-driven approach helps to keep you focused on the actions that will deliver the biggest results for the best returns.

When determining your metrics, consider these examples from the EDF Green Freight Handbook:

Metrics

Join me on January 14 at 12PM ET for a webinar that will introduce you to the full Green Freight Journey framework, review real-world case examples and highlight tools EDF is making available to help companies progress on their journey.

Register here today for this informative webinar.

Steps on the Green Freight Journey:

Start Your Green Freight Journey with EDF

Many leading companies are creating business value today by cutting carbon emissions from freight moves. These companies, such as Walmart, Ikea, Unilever and Ocean Spray, are following a similar path, one we at EDF are calling the Green Freight Journey, a five-step framework for freight optimization projects.

Sign up to learn more about the Journey.

Define the path. Then take a step. Then take another.

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Companies start by taking the nebulous concept of sustainability and making it mean something specific and material to their company, for example, “we are going to use fuel more efficiently." They create specific metrics to track this objective, such as product moved per gallon of fuel consumed, or emissions per ton-mile.

Next, these companies develop pilot green freight projects to test out that objective, using the metrics they chose to evaluate the projects’ efficacy. The projects that deliver financial and environmental returns are scaled up and those that don't are redesigned or scrapped.

Leaders have a critical role to play in this process as well: they create long-term improvement goals for their company’s key metrics. This enables them to focus day-to-day on continuous improvement, and it inoculates them against the siren call of “big shiny object” projects – ones that might be good for a press release but won’t move the needle on their metrics.

By taking these steps, companies advance along their Green Freight Journey, and along the way, cut costs and emissions.

Now it’s your turn.

Every company that uses the freight system to move products to market has opportunities to reduce operating costs and greenhouse gas emissions by taking a Green Freight Journey. Join me on January 14 at 12PM ET for a webinar that will introduce you to the Green Freight Journey framework, review real-world case examples and highlight tools EDF is making available to help companies progress on their journey.

During the webinar, participants will:

  • Be introduced to the steps of a Green Freight Journey and receive tips for success on each;
  • Hear real-world examples of companies that have cut emissions and costs by optimizing freight moves;
  • Review existing tools, including a green freight benchmarking survey and the EDF Green Freight Handbook; and
  • Learn how an EDF Climate Corps fellow helped Ocean Spray Cranberries identify new green freight opportunities.

Register here today for this informative webinar.

Good News for America: Cleaner, More Efficient Trucks that Protect Our Environment and Strengthen Our Economy

jason_mathers2014 is shaping up to be a great year for truck equipment manufacturers. Sales through October are running 20% higher than their 2013 levels. It’s a banner year that continues to pick-up steam. 2015 is looking even stronger, with forecasts suggesting it will be the 3rd strongest year ever for truck sales. There are several factors driving this market. Higher fuel efficiency is top among them.

This point was brought home recently by the lead transportation analyst for investment firm Stifel, who noted that “the superior fuel efficiency of the newer engines” was a key in getting fleets to buy new trucks now.

The CEO of Daimler Trucks, the leading producer of class 8 trucks for the U.S. market, acknowledged recently that their most efficient engine and transmission combination was “already sold out for 2014” and that the “demand is beyond their expectations.”

It’s not just Daimler that is having a good year.

2014 is a banner year for truck sales; and 2014 trucks are the most efficient ever.  2014 trucks are the most efficient ever because of smart, well-design federal policy.  This is the first year of the 2014-2018 heavy truck efficiency standards that will:

  • reduce CO2 emissions by about 270million metric tons,
  • save about 530 million barrels of oil over the life of vehicles built between 2014 – 2018,
  • provide $49 billion in net program benefits.

The 2014-2018 heavy truck fuel efficiency and greenhouse gas program demonstrates that climate policy benefits businesses, our economy, and human health, while also cutting harmful climate pollution.

Or, as Martin Daum, president and CEO of Daimler Trucks North America noted, these standards “are very good examples of regulations that work well.”

In its first year of existence, the 2014-2018 fuel efficiency and greenhouse gas program is boosting sales for manufacturers, reducing operating costs for fleets, and cutting climate pollution for all of us. It is clear that well-designed federal standards can foster the innovation necessary to bring more efficient and lower emitting trucks to market.   That is very good news, because we have an opportunity to further improve and strengthen these standards – creating more economic and environmental benefits in the process.  For this, we all can be thankful.

The Supply Chain Word of 2014: Omnichannel

As we head into the last months of 2014 – and more importantly, the holiday season — I'm ready to make my nomination for the "word of the year." And no, it’s not “salmon cannon,” “bromance,” or others proposed by John Oliver or Stephen Colbert. The word supply chain and sustainability leaders should take away from 2014 is omnichannel.Omnichannel diagram

At its core, omnichannel is an approach to retail that aims to deliver a holistic shopping experience that integrates in-store and online platforms, combining the supply chain of brick-and-mortar stores and e-commerce. It recognizes the staying power of each, the expectation of the customer for consistent prices across platforms and the ability to choose how, when and where to receive his/her purchases.

Folks that make a living thinking about how to allocate and where to place inventory have been using the word for a few years. In 2014, though, omnichannel crossed the chasm from being wonky, industry-speak to being a mainstream business concept – covered recently in USA Today – and a core aspect of competing in the digital age.

Which brings us to an important question: what are the environmental implications of omnichannel retailing?

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Advancing on the Green Freight Journey: Discover Your Next Steps at RILA Sustainability

freightContainers-100x133Every product that ends up on a retail shelf or is sold online has a freight footprint. The annual impact of freight across U.S. retail and consumer goods supply chains is significant – over 160 million metrics tons of greenhouse emissions. Or, more than ten times Walmart’s 2010 scope 1 & 2 emissions in the United States.

There are ample opportunities for retailers and their suppliers to improve efficiency, reduce costs and emissions from their freight supply chain. These companies can get more products on each truckload, move more cargo by rail, and collaborate with other companies to find shipping efficiencies.

To capture the most savings opportunities, companies need a long-term plan of action with common key performance indicators (KPIs) and goals shared between logistics teams and corporate sustainability officers.

EDF created our Green Freight Journey model to be a framework that companies can use to manage supply chain freight emissions. The Green Freight Journey has five steps:

Green Freight Journey

  • Step One: Get Started, where a company assembles the right group of internal stakeholders and defines its objectives and key metrics.
  • Step Two: Create Momentum, where a company launches a pilot effort to improve performance in one key area. It leverages the results of the pilot to increase internal visibility about the strong value of green freight initiatives.
  • Step Three: Accelerate Performance, where a company expands the scope of its green freight efforts from one or two projects to a system-wide effort to reduce costs and emissions.
  • Step Four: Declare a Goal, where a company sets a multi-year goal to drive internal focus and resource allocation.
  • Step Five: Raise the Bar, having accomplished its first generation green freight goal, a company assess and sets a new longer term improvement target.

If you are attending RILA Sustainability later this month, visit the EDF booth (NP6) in the exhibit hall to learn more how your company can leverage the Green Freight Journey framework to identify and implement cost and emission reductions project. In addition to the EDF Green Freight Handbook, we will available at our booth have a benchmarking survey for companies to help them assess their next step on the Green Freight Journey.

Procter & Gamble, CVS, Colgate and Others Demonstrate “We” > “Me”

Mathers_Jason (1)When looking for ways to increase supply chain efficiencies, few strategies have the cost and emissions savings potential of collaborative distribution or shared shipping—where companies pool freight resources to reduce the amount of truck trips required to move supplies or products. As the Guardian noted in a recent article on Ocean Spray and Tropicana’s shared shipping collaboration, companies stand to annually save billions of dollars and cut over a hundred million tons of climate pollution by adopting this strategy.

A recent Logistics Management report–Getting From “Me” to “We”: Creating a Shared Infrastructure for Product Distribution–dug deeply into this topic too. It shared several examples of how leading companies are implementing this strategy. The example that stood out to me involved CVS, Kimberly-Clark and Colgate.

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