Methane shareholder resolutions could yield big change, says investor

Oil and gas investor pressure is building, with 20 climate shareholder resolutions up for review at annual meetings held by publicly-traded energy companies this month. While the climate filings cover a range of issues, improved methane management is in the mix.

Last year was a breakout year for methane investor activism. ExxonMobil’s XTO Energy subsidiary business announced a reduction plan in response to a 2017 methane disclosure resolution, with onlookers expecting more change to follow this year from others. Meanwhile, a growing global network representing 36 investors and $4.2 trillion in managed assets continue to call on companies for methane reductions.

In the second-part of our interview series with Jamie Bonham, Manager of Corporate Engagement at NEI, we talk about how influential Environment, Social and Governance (ESG) shareholder resolutions, such as methane, have been in the past. We also discuss what prompts investors to file resolutions, and the potential impact on companies.

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In Its 5th Citizenship Report, KKR Reaches Beyond ESG

This post is part of an EDF+Business ongoing series on sustainable finance, highlighting market mechanisms and strategies that drive environmental performance by engaging private capital. EDF is actively engaging leaders with the capital and expertise needed to catalyze sector-wide changes—from accelerating investment in energy efficiency and clean energy, to protecting tropical forests, restoring depleted fisheries and saving habitats of endangered species.

Sustainability pioneer and inspiration to many of us at EDF, Ray Anderson frequently talked about his company’s efforts to scale the seven faces of Mount Sustainability and develop a more responsible company along the way. Summiting a mountain is a good analogy for a company’s journey to improve its environmental performance. To succeed you need a plan, commitment, resources, and the ability to change direction if there are obstacles in your path.

In the case of a private equity firm like KKR & Co. L.P. – with over 56 portfolio companies participating in value creation programs linked to its environment, social and governance (ESG) strategy since 2009– the journey is more akin to traversing an entire mountain range, whose contours keep evolving as companies enter and exit their portfolio.

That changing landscape is what’s driven KKR to continue to adapt how it manages ESG challenges and opportunities. KKR’s recently-released 5th annual ESG & Citizenship Report details how these programs have continued to evolve since our initial partnership in 2008.

Our work together helped drive KKR’s Green Portfolio Program which, six years later, has added a cumulative $1.2 billion to its portfolio companies’ bottom lines while avoiding more than 2.3 million metric tons of greenhouse gases and reducing waste by 6.3 million metric tons and water use by 27 million cubic meters, according to results announced last fall.

kkr_logo_13932KKR’s latest report documents the firm’s progress in advancing ongoing efforts, including measuring and improving ESG performance at key portfolio companies, rolling out a publicly available ESG policy across its global private equity staff, contributing its expertise to the Sustainable Accounting Standards Boards’ development of ESG disclosure guidelines, bringing together sustainability professionals and other experts at its first Sustainability Summit last year, and hiring a full-time energy expert and two EDF Climate Corps fellows to help its portfolio companies more systematically adopt solutions for better energy management.

In addition, something new caught our eye. KKR plans to refocus its investment efforts through one of three lenses – responsible investing, solutions investing and impact investing.

  • Responsible investing incorporates ESG metrics and analysis into investment decisions.
  • Solutions investing refers to investments made in companies that have an intentional focus on solving a societal challenge and deliver traditional returns to investors, such as providers of reusable bulk shipping containers, developers of environmentally-responsible office buildings in Korea and microfinance groups increasing access to capital for business owners in rural and semirural India.
  • Impact investing goes beyond the other two, focusing on investments in companies that put environmental and social impacts on par or even ahead of financial impacts. KKR began advising two impact businesses in 2013 by providing technical assistance, helping the companies scale their businesses and secure additional funding. Moving forward, KKR will consider investing in such businesses.

At EDF, we believe that private capital can and must be part of the solution to our biggest environmental challenges. We’re encouraged to see major investors like KKR expand their investment strategy as the next step in this journey and eager to see the environmental and financial results it delivers.

EDF Climate Corps Proves its ROI for Private Equity Firms

As summer officially gets underway, the 2015 EDF Climate Corps fellows are already off to the races seeking out energy and cost-saving opportunities for some of the world’s largest companies and organizations. Among those participating, we are pleased to place 13 fellows with private equity firms and their portfolio companies, the largest such cohort in a single summer, besting last year’s record of 12 fellows. This brings the grand total up to 57 EDF Climate Corps fellows who have worked in the private equity sector (including with portfolio companies) to date.

EDF Climate Corps fellows Yien Huang (left) and Jiamu Lu (right) collaborating at the fellow training

EDF Climate Corps fellows Yien Huang (left) and Jiamu Lu (right) collaborating at the fellow training

Since 2008, EDF has worked with the private equity sector to drive environmental results, beginning with a partnership with KKR & Co. L.P., and later with The Carlyle Group and Oak Hill Capital Partners. Resulting from this work was a suite of free tools designed to help firms identify and manage environment, social and governance (ESG) issues. EDF Climate Corps offers private equity firms a powerful resource that continues to deliver environmental benefits alongside real financial returns.

This year, as in past years, we continue to see a diverse range of participating companies and projects:

  • In 2015, we welcome new hosts Guitar Center, NBTY (vitamin/food supplement supplier), Ortho Clinical Diagnostics (medical equipment manufacturer), Pharmaceutical Product Development, and Gelson's Markets (a grocery chain in southern California).
  • Among returning companies, we’re excited to welcome back Floor & Décor, Philadelphia Energy Solutions, Avaya, and Caesars Entertainment, the last of which was featured in episode 7 of the Showtime series Years of Living Dangerously (now available on Netflix, Hulu and Amazon Prime), which profiled the efforts of EDF Climate Corps.
  • HCA Healthcare will also be returning, marking the company’s sixth straight year of participation.
  • KKR & Co. L.P., Carlyle Group, and Hellman & Friedman will have fellows working at the firm level this year.

The work that these fellows will engage in this summer ranges from energy benchmarking and efficiency upgrades to demand response assessments and green revolving loan fund design. We’ve written previously about the myriad ways that fellows can add value both at private equity firms and portfolio companies and we’re excited to see new stories unfold this summer. Watch this space as well as our Climate Corps-specific blog, where fellows across a variety of sectors will share their experiences and accomplishments.

Carlyle Sheds Light on How Sustainability Creates Value in 2015

This post is part of an EDF+Business ongoing series on sustainable finance, highlighting market mechanisms and strategies that drive environmental performance by engaging private capital. EDF is actively engaging leaders with the capital and expertise needed to catalyze sector-wide changes—from accelerating investment in energy efficiency and clean energy, to protecting tropical forests, restoring depleted fisheries and saving habitats of endangered species.


On the eve of The Carlyle Group releasing its 2015 Corporate Citizenship Report, I had the chance to catch up with Jackie Roberts, Chief Sustainability Officer at Carlyle and former EDF colleague who was one of the founders of EDF’s Corporate Partnership Program. Here are highlights from our conversation:

Jackie RobertsWhat attracted you to your current role at Carlyle?

Rather than being in an arm’s-length advisory role, I now get into more of the details of implementation. I work directly to support sustainability leads in a broad range of companies, helping them prioritize among business goals, crystallize sustainability strategies and, most importantly, execute on a lot of different ideas. Also, as Carlyle is an owner of companies in many countries and industries, I have the opportunity to understand how aspects of sustainability play out differently across the globe. In short, it is a tremendous platform for influencing corporate sustainability.

What are you and Carlyle particularly proud of in this year’s report?

This is the first year that we have designed the report to align with the types of value creation we typically see, such as customer satisfaction, brand equity, operational efficiency and workplace strength. This year’s report moves beyond operational efficiencies into these other key drivers for companies.

What does Carlyle see as the value of ESG management for its business? How do you quantify that value? What form is that taking, both for Carlyle and its portfolio companies?

We have examples across these four ways that ESG management connects to value creation (customer satisfaction, brand equity, operational efficiency and workplace strength). A great example related to both customer satisfaction and brand equity comes from a portfolio company that quantified its sales increase for greener products. Their primary customers, mainly hotels, were requesting green products, so the company invested in this area, which paid off in increased sales – a clear win-win. Read more

Oak Hill Capital Continues to Chart the ESG Course for Middle-Market Private Equity Firms

Last year, Oak Hill Capital Partners released its inaugural environmental, social, and governance (ESG) performance report. While you may have read about similar reports from private equity firms like KKR and The Carlyle Group on this blog, Oak Hill Capital’s report was significant because it were first among U.S. middle-market private equity firms to publicly release an ESG performance report. In doing so, the firm increased transparency and offered other mid-market firms a blueprint to follow. Last week, it issued its second annual report, offering an inside look at the firm’s progress to date.

Oak Hill Capital Partners logoA comprehensive approach

In its new report, Oak Hill Capital outlines its approach to ESG management, measuring progress in integration, results and leadership: three of the key building blocks for a successful ESG management program that are included in our ESG Management Tool for private equity.

For Oak Hill Capital, integration refers to the ways it embeds ESG management practices across the firm’s operations to ensure it can best deliver results at portfolio companies. Key examples from the report include its responsible investment policy, incorporation of ESG in due diligence, and its recently becoming a signatory of the United Nations Principles for Responsible Investment (UNPRI). Management of environmental performance is also woven into the management of the firm, through its ESG Committee, which is made up of senior executives and chaired by Oak Hill Capital’s general counsel.

Results speak to how the firm evaluates the ESG performance of potential new investments and how it tracks and supports the sustainability efforts of portfolio companies. This year’s report includes how the firm considered ESG factors in the due diligence process of three new investments and how existing portfolio companies have benefited from the firm’s expertise in ESG issues. One example is an energy efficiency project Oak Hill Capital initiated at its portfolio company, Dave and Buster’s, with Entouch Controls, a leading energy management solution for restaurants and schools.

Lastly, Oak Hill Capital takes a broad approach to leadership, both within the industry and in the communities in which it operates: promoting lessons learned among similarly-sized firms, as well as engaging employees in business-focused mentorship opportunities.

A diverse portfolio of sustainability initiatives Read more

From the inside-out: Warburg Pincus and EDF Climate Corps’ recipe for replication

Since 2008, EDF has worked with private equity firms to integrate environmental, social and governance (ESG) management into their practices. Leveraging our EDF Climate Corps program is a key strategy for replicating our work and we have now placed 44 EDF Climate Corps fellows among private equity firms and portfolio companies, to date. To learn more about how a particular firm has benefitted, I recently spoke with representatives at Warburg Pincus to hear how the EDF Climate Corps program has enhanced their continued efforts to share ESG-related best practices with Warburg Pincus' portfolio companies.

warburg1

This summer, Warburg Pincus hosted an EDF Climate Corps fellow for the second year in a row, and again chose to place the fellow at the firm level, rather than with a single portfolio company. “Running this process from the center allowed us to identify different opportunities, across our portfolio and coordinate work on each of them,” Warburg Pincus Vice President Michael Frain told me.

From speaking further with Frain and Daphne Patterson, Warburg Pincus’ first EDF Climate Corps fellow and newly minted associate, four key themes emerged:

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In New Report, KKR Deepens Commitment to Tackling ESG Concerns

Too often, environmental performance gets labeled as the responsibility of one team within a company – whether that of a dedicated sustainability staff, external or public affairs, legal or compliance, etc. As a result, a company’s staff can often think of environmental and social governance (ESG) issues as what Douglas Adams once famously termed an SEP – Somebody Else’s Problem.

kkr_logo_13932

With the release of its 2013 ESG and Citizenship Report, private equity firm Kravis Kohlberg & Roberts (KKR) shows it’s taking a different approach:  KKR has adopted a new global policy that makes identifying and addressing ESG risks in both the pre-investment and investment phases, for its staff, everyone’s problem.

Notably, KKR’s private equity investment professionals are being integrated into the ESG risk assessment process: first, in assessing risks during the diligence phase, and second, working with portfolio companies, consultants and subject matter experts to set performance goals and measure against them during the typical five to seven years a company remains part of its portfolio.

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Oak Hill Capital Partner’s first ESG report blazes a trail for the middle-market

This week, Oak Hill Capital Partners (Oak Hill) became the first U.S. middle-market private equity firm to publically report on its environmental, social, and governance (ESG) performance.  Another first for Oak Hill and an extension of the ESG trend kicked off by industry leaders – including Carlyle and KKR – over the past few years.

Just last year, Oak Hill and EDF teamed up to demonstrate that opportunities to improve environmental performance were not limited to the mega buyout firms.  We worked together to create a methodology that mapped environmental management opportunities across Oak Hill’s portfolio based on potential environmental impacts, financial results, and management’s readiness to act.

Oak Hill’s new report discusses the firm’s work to expand its ESG efforts and shares its progress to date.  Last December, EDF released a new ESG management tool for the private equity sector.  The Tool is informed by our work in the private equity sector over the past five years and defines the practices needed to build a successful ESG management program.  Many of these best practices have been embedded in Oak Hill’s approach to ESG management and are evident in the firm’s first public report including:

1) Commitment from the top:  Successful ESG initiatives require strong commitment from the top. Oak Hill’s Responsible Investment Policy, ESG related trainings for the firm and its portfolio companies, and the commitment to publically report annually underscore the support for the firm’s leadership and commitment to make ESG management a core part of the way Oak Hill does business.

2) Integrating ESG into due diligence:  Collaborating with BSR to understand the key ESG risks and opportunities of potential investments is admirable, but it’s also smart business.  Just as we’ve seen in our partnerships with other leading private equity firms, integrating ESG into the due diligence process results in opportunities to reduce risks, increase efficiency, and improve performance.

3) Engaging with the right stakeholders leads to results: Private equity firms are increasingly building relationships with key stakeholder groups to gain new insights and improve operations.  Competing private equity firms take notice; three of Oak Hill’s portfolio companies have hosted EDF Climate Corps fellows.  EDF Climate Corps trains graduate students to quickly understand and improve the way organizations use energy by identifying lasting solutions with long-term financial and environmental benefits.  To date, over 30 private equity firms and portfolio companies have tapped in to this program to reduce energy use, cut greenhouse gas pollution, and save money.

In the past few years the private equity sector’s approach to ESG has evolved rapidly and we’ve been hearing from more and more players in the sector, including both asset managers and owners, about how to improve ESG performance.

Oak Hill is continuing to lead the charge in the middle-market.  The secret to Oak Hill’s successful ESG strategy is that there is no secret.

Any private equity firm can do this if they dedicate time and resources to the effort.  Luckily, the next firm to stand up to the challenge will have Oak Hill’s report as a blueprint.